Malheur County, Oregon Business

     No firm stands higher commercially at home or abroad than the one above. It is composed of M. G. and J. W. Hope both of them being residents of this county sine 1882 having ranched in the valley for about five years before they began merchandising. DL G. Hope was appointed postmaster in the spring of 1887, and he opened a small store, six months later his brother joined him, and by fair and courteous treatment of their customers their business has grown to such an extent that in 1895 they were compelled to erect their present store of which we give it an it illustration. It is built of stone 48x80, with basement, and is equipped with freight elevator to expedite the handling of heavy goods. They carry a general line of merchandise also farming implements. In connection with J. N. Fell, they are interested in the Vale Electric Light Company, and the Vale Milling Company. They are also interested as part owners in Eldridge's addition to the town site, and besides outlying ranches, own one of 120 acres just adjoining the town. This enables them from a practical standpoint to be in a position to answer any questions regarding lands in the vicinity of Vale.
     The ranch contains 1120 acres; there are 32,000 shade trees, 16,000 fruit trees, 360 acres planted to alfalfa, 135 acres in orchards, and the reclamation of this land from its desert state in the period of six years shows the wonderful resources of a new country just opened up to horticulture in the eastern part of our state and which is soon to make a name for itself as one of the great fruit producing belts of the Northwest. I allude to that portion of Malheur County located on the Oregon Short Line railroad between Nyssa and Ontario, in the vicinity of Arcadia, and which is now the scene of active developments brought about by the construction of the great Owyhee canal. The country is rapidly going into orchards as nowhere can the apple, prune and pear be grown so successfully as in this vicinity. The soil, climate and everything here is especial­ly adapted to fruit culture. The land produces the finest apples, prunes and pears in the world, also grows to perfection peaches, cherries, plums, apricots, grapes, nectarines, etc. Nor is the fruit industry the only industry we find in Arcadia. The largest cattle feeding yards on the Oregon Short Line System containing over 25 acres in corrals, and all the modern appliances for feeding live stock in winter. Properly speaking the business of the K. S. D. Fruit Land Company is to raise fruit and sell it in winter, to raise hay and feed cattle in winter. Yet the rapid development of their fruit industry has made it necessary for them to colonize a portion of their lands which they have subdivided into small orchard tracts in order to induce immediate settlement to and during the busy fruit picking season, and they are offering some very good inducements to a few families who are looking for homes. The railroad company have now placed a half a mile of sidetrack at Arcadia, and a very pretty village has been laid off for people to live, a post office has been established and a number of dwellings have been going up. There is a fine opening for a general store at Arcadia, as the valley contains 140 families aside from the colony.

    This enterprise is one worthy of considerable mention. The accompanying cut hardly does justice to what is by all odds the best constructed flouring mill in this section of the state. The building is four-stories, the two lower being stone, and they have a capacity of 50 barrels daily. Their machinery is of the very latest type, constructed by Marsh, Gordon & Co., of Warsaw, Ind. They have ten bolters and four double stands of rollers. Their power is obtained from the Malheur River; giving them a fall of 11˝ feet, open the year round. They will make flour, graham and whole wheat, corn meal and mill feed. There wildly brand is known as "Purity." and that word fully represents the quality of their products. The establish­ment of this mill has been of great benefit to the farmers of this county as it enables them to realize the highest price for their wheat and greatly curtails the little spent in hauling to the railroad. The officers at present tire J. N. Fell. President; John E. Johnson, vice president; M. G. Hope, secretary and treasurer.
     Mr. N. T. Taggart, the head miller, has had twenty-four years experience in the business, being connected with the flouring mill at Etna Green, Indiana, for that length of time.

     No firm stands higher commercially at home or abroad than the one above. It is composed of M. G. and J. W. Hope both of them being residents of this county sine 1882 having ranched in the valley for about five years before they began merchandising. DL G. Hope was appointed postmaster in the spring of 1887, and he opened a small store, six months later his brother joined him, and by fair and courteous treatment of their customers their business has grown to such an extent that in 1895 they were compelled to erect their present store of which we give it an it illustration. It is built of stone 48x80, with basement, and is equipped with freight elevator to expedite the handling of heavy goods. They carry a general line of merchandise also farming implements. In connection with J. N. Fell, they are interested in the Vale Electric Light Company, and the Vale Milling Company. They are also interested as part owners in Eldridge's addition to the town site, and besides outlying ranches, own one of 120 acres just adjoining the town. This enables them from a practical standpoint to be in a position to answer any questions regarding lands in the vicinity of Vale.
     The ranch contains 1120 acres; there are 32,000 shade trees, 16,000 fruit trees, 360 acres planted to alfalfa, 135 acres in orchards, and the reclamation of this land from its desert state in the period of six years shows the wonderful resources of a new country just opened up to horticulture in the eastern part of our state and which is soon to make a name for itself as one of the great fruit producing belts of the Northwest. I allude to that portion of Malheur County located on the Oregon Short Line railroad between Nyssa and Ontario, in the vicinity of Arcadia, and which is now the scene of active developments brought about by the construction of the great Owyhee canal. The country is rapidly going into orchards as nowhere can the apple, prune and pear be grown so successfully as in this vicinity. The soil, climate and everything here is especial­ly adapted to fruit culture. The land produces the finest apples, prunes and pears in the world, also grows to perfection peaches, cherries, plums, apricots, grapes, nectarines, etc. Nor is the fruit industry the only industry we find in Arcadia. The largest cattle feeding yards on the Oregon Short Line System containing over 25 acres in corrals, and all the modern appliances for feeding live stock in winter. Properly speaking the business of the K. S. D. Fruit Land Company is to raise fruit and sell it in winter, to raise hay and feed cattle in winter. Yet the rapid development of their fruit industry has made it necessary for them to colonize a portion of their lands which they have subdivided into small orchard tracts in order to induce immediate settlement to and during the busy fruit picking season, and they are offering some very good inducements to a few families who are looking for homes. The railroad company have now placed a half a mile of sidetrack at Arcadia, and a very pretty village has been laid off for people to live, a post office has been established and a number of dwellings have been going up. There is a fine opening for a general store at Arcadia, as the valley contains 140 families aside from the colony.

    This enterprise is one worthy of considerable mention. The accompanying cut hardly does justice to what is by all odds the best constructed flouring mill in this section of the state. The building is four-stories, the two lower being stone, and they have a capacity of 50 barrels daily. Their machinery is of the very latest type, constructed by Marsh, Gordon & Co., of Warsaw, Ind. They have ten bolters and four double stands of rollers. Their power is obtained from the Malheur River; giving them a fall of 11˝ feet, open the year round. They will make flour, graham and whole wheat, corn meal and mill feed. There wildly brand is known as "Purity." and that word fully represents the quality of their products. The establish­ment of this mill has been of great benefit to the farmers of this county as it enables them to realize the highest price for their wheat and greatly curtails the little spent in hauling to the railroad. The officers at present tire J. N. Fell. President; John E. Johnson, vice president; M. G. Hope, secretary and treasurer.
     Mr. N. T. Taggart, the head miller, has had twenty-four years experience in the business, being connected with the flouring mill at Etna Green, Indiana, for that length of time.

K. S. D. Fruit Farm - Arcadia

     The two views in this issue taken from K. S. D. fruit farm at Arcadian, Malheur County, show the possibilities of successful irrigation when applied to the arid lands of Eastern Oregon. This farm has attracted wide attention on account of its magnificent park and beautiful drive­ways.  The grand boulevard being 60 feet wide and two miles long.  The growing orchards and broad acres of the alfalfa surrounded on all sides by thousands of tall shade trees make it one of the most attractive places in the state.

Oregon Forwarding Company

It is seldom that a larger mercantile establishment is to he found in any city on the coast than that of the Ore­gon Forwarding Company at Ontario. Established in 1885 by Fred J. Kiesel, of Ogden, Utah, it has grown under the style of Fred J. Kiesel, Wm. Teary & Co., and Kiesel, Shilling & Danelson, and since February 23, 1890, as the Oregon Forwarding Company, being incorporated on that date with E. H. Test as manager. They carry a complete line of general merchandise and stockmen's supplies. Agricultural implements, hardware, etc., and acting as general agents among many other lines, for the following: Studebaker Wagons, McCormick Mowers, Thomas Hay Rakes, Planet Jr. Farming Implements, Pasts Brewing Co., and Idanha Natural Mineral Water Co. Their main store, of which we present an illustration, is 65x110. Their warehouses, four in number, have a total capacity of 18,000 square feet, enabling them to buy largely in car lots, as in the mouth of May 1897 alone, they received 506.226 lbs. of merchandise. Their trade extends into Malheur, Harney and Grant counties, Oregon, and Washington and Owyhee Counties, Idaho, and their stock and prices enable any one to have the same opportunities they would have going to the largest mercantile centers. They also do a very extensive forwarding business for interior points.

The new and strictly first-class hotel, the Ontario, opened by G. L. Belding, July 1, 1897, is highly appreciated by residents of Eastern Oregon, and is largely patronized by traveling men and cattle buyers. Our illustration gives but an imperfect idea of its size, it being a three-story building, 60x80. There are 50 rooms all being, what is known as "outside rooms" in hotel parlance, in the hotel bar none but high grade liquors and cigars are carried, handling Cyrus Noble's Whiskies in case and in bulk, and principally imported cigars. Mr. G. L. Belding, the proprietor, is a veteran hotel man, having been located formerly in this business at LaCamas and Fairhaven, Wash. He gives the hotel his personal supervision, and having a full appreciation of the needs and comforts of his guests spares no pains to provide for their every want.

Eastern Oregon Gold Fields

Malheur County

Search Oregon Genealogy

Malheur County

Oregon Counties I Host

Oregon Genealogy Records

Other Genealogy Records


Oregon Host

 


Member Site


Member Site


Contribute to Oregon Genealogy
If you have information you would like contribute to the website, please use our comment form!! If you find a broken link please let us know!

 

Oregon Genealogy

Copyright 2004-2017, the web pages may be linked to but shall not be reproduced on another site without written permission from Oregon Genealogy. Images may not be linked to in any manner or method. Anyone may use the information provided here freely for personal use only. If you plan on publishing your personal information to the web please give proper credit to our site for providing this information. Thanks!!!